I believe that life is precious and that we all have the right to live it abundantly. Consider the following paradox: To live life most abundantly you must live as if it may be your last day; while living as if you will live a very long time. Imagine that you’ve suddenly learned that this may be your last day alive. What would you be feeling and how would you experience your last 24 hours?

A healthy response would be to live it very consciously and deliberately, savoring each moment to the fullest, seeing the sunrise as if for the first time, hearing birds differently, smelling familiar things deeply, taking in the sunset with the ones you love, sharing things with the important people in your life that you had always meant to say. Interactions would be experienced from a very different perspective, priorities suddenly coming into clear focus.

You would begin getting to know people in your life again for the first time, as you experience yourself and them differently – as becoming in the precious time remaining. You would begin living life manually; consciously noticing the various “Nuggets” that are present in any given situation.

You can decide to live your life with meaning and purpose today! You can deliberately choose to relax into New Program principles and attitudes consciously, imperfectly. This allows you the greatest chance of making healthy changes in your life. It also allows you the most pleasure and enjoyment possible at any given time. If you are willing to invest the time and thought necessary, you can learn to live this way. It’s nice to have a choice! Reflect deeply on this truth, it is a key to freedom and growth.

At the same time you are living each day as if it might be your last, imagine living your life as if you are going to be around a long, long time. What do you notice as you look from this long-range perspective? Living life as a long-term investment has a significant impact on your perspective. When I was first married to my wife, Sonia, 35 years ago, we both made the conscious decision that “since we are going to be married for a very long time, we may as well make it as good and enjoyable as possible.” That commitment has been very helpful over the years when deciding whether or not to invest energy in dealing with problem situations.

As a long-term investment, my marriage pays the best dividends and interest if I deal with things as quickly as possible, so we have the longest time to enjoy the rewards of our efforts. This long-term perspective helps you own the fact that you are chooser in your life, that you live out the long-term consequences of your choices – whether you are conscious of choosing or not. How do you like your consequences up until now?

Compare this sense of permanency with one of constantly wondering if your relationship is going to end today or maybe tomorrow. There is a high price for avoiding commitment in important relationships. The Fundamental Principles of Healthy Change reflected throughout this material help you live your life to the fullest by embracing the paradox of abundance.

 

Continuing Your Journey...